Summer travel safety tips from Calcasieu Parish Sheriff’s Office


Lake Charles, LA (KPLC) – Summer travel continues to make a strong comeback this year, with many finally taking the big trips they’ve put off since COVID. As the prices of gas and airfare skyrocket, you may be watching your wallet, but officials with the Calcasieu Parish Sheriff’s Office says it’s also important to keep an eye on your belongings and the way you travel.

“Make sure you plan your route the right way carefully so that someone knows which route you’re taking, so just in case there is a wreck and you’re unconscious they’ll know who to call and about where to call,” Calcasieu Parish Chief Deputy Stitch Guillory said.

State troopers also recommend a proactive approach by practicing “heads up driving.” That means looking further down the road, instead of only at the vehicle in front of you.

If you’re in a rush, authorities say you may forget the most basic yet vital item on the list – securing your home. Always double-check doors, windows and entry points to make sure they are secure, and lock all valuables away. While more and more people have security cameras installed, it’s still smart to tell a trusted person about your trip.

“The most important thing they can do is get to know their neighbor,” Guillory said. “Make sure that you’re neighbor is aware that you are going out of town and that no cars should be there and ask your neighbor to help keep a watch for your house.”

You can also call the sheriff’s office to alert them of your getaway, and a deputy will be sent out to patrol your home periodically.

Lastly, keep an eye on your kids in crowded areas like airports and rest stops while traveling.

Copyright 2022 KPLC. All rights reserved.



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Queensland travel agent warns of staff shortages as quarantine-free travel opens


A veteran Queensland travel agent is warning of a looming “supply crunch” as agents struggle to meet the demand from the high number of people planning an overseas holiday.

From 1am today, quarantine-free international travel into Queensland for fully vaccinated people resumed.

Travellers will not have to quarantine, provided they are fully vaccinated and have a negative COVID-19 rapid antigen test (RAT) result within 24 hours of entering the country.

The principal of Main Beach Travel on the Gold Coast, Mike Dwyer, said one in three travel agencies had closed since the COVID-19 pandemic hit in early 2020.

“We’re already struggling to service existing demand which is really just the tip of the iceberg.”

The industry veteran said people who wanted to travel overseas needed to start thinking about it sooner rather than later. 

“About half of our incoming calls are from travellers who are stranded overseas needing help to reorganise their flights home,” Mr Dwyer said.  

Great haired man wearing a white shirt and black jacket.
Mike Dwyer is concerned there’s a looming shortage of agents to service overseas travellers.(Supplied: Mike Dwyer)

“I am really concerned about our industry and the lack of travel agencies and the lack of support for the industry.

“As the demand ramps up, we are going to hit a supply crunch, because there’s not enough agents to help people make their plans.” 

Mr Dwyer opened his business in 2000 and said his focus is on servicing outbound travellers.

“Aussies have always been great travellers and many people have had their plans cancelled over the last two years.

“There’s lots of people with family in Europe who they haven’t seen for two years.”

The travel business owner said quarantine-free travel would now give more people the confidence to book a holiday.

a closed travel agency displays closed signs on its doors
Mr Dwyer says one in three agencies closed during the COVID-19 pandemic.(AAP: Mick Tsikas)

“One of the biggest impediments for travelling overseas has been the fear of coming home and quarantining for two weeks,” he said.

“Removing that restriction makes it a lot better for people wanting to get overseas.

“I think people have lost faith in the consistency of the rules so there will be a lot of nervousness still.”

Logistical challenges

Mr Dwyer said COVID-related challenges meant more people were choosing to book through a travel agent rather than handle the bookings themselves.

“Every country has its own set of rules and regulations.

“On top of that, the airlines have specific requirements about being tested either 24 or 48 hours before a flight.”

Passangers wearing face masks exit an airport tunnel
Chris Mills says it could take months for airlines to restore international connections. (AAP: James Ross)

Inbound travel 

When it comes to inbound travel, the chief executive of Queensland Airports, Chris Mills, said he was expecting a trickle, and not a flood, of international travellers to arrive in tourist destinations including the Gold Coast.

“What we’re expecting [is] from February onwards; we’re working with the airlines to get them back on restoring connections with countries that are in pretty good shape.”

Mr Mills said countries including New Zealand, Singapore, Japan and South Korea would be prioritised.  



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Manitoba to lift last of fire and travel restrictions amid rainy weather


WINNIPEG —
The last of Manitoba’s travel and fire restrictions are being lifted thanks to the recent rainy weather.

In a release on Tuesday, the Manitoba Wildfire Service said the last restrictions which had been in place in Area 4 are being lifted at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 25.

“Manitobans are reminded there are still some areas where the risk of wildfire may still exist even after the rain, therefore caution is required,” the province said in a release.

Manitobans in this area will once again be able to get burning permits through local or regional Manitoba Conservation and Climate offices. The province said campfires are permitted only in approved pits.

All trails in provincial parks have been reopened.

The province said as of Monday, 115 fires were burning in the province. Of these fires, 10 are out of control, four fires are being held, and 11 are under control. There are 81 fires that are being monitored by the province.

The largest of Manitoba’s out-of-control fires is more than 10,800 hectares in size. The fire is burning near the Bloodvein First Nation, and has been since July 16.

Manitobans are reminded to check with local municipal offices for more information about burning restrictions, as many municipalities have implemented their own restrictions. More information can be found online.

Manitobans can report a wildfire by calling 911 or the toll-free tip line at 1-800-782-0076.





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Top 10 Budget Destinations 2020 | MojoTravels

See the world without breaking the bank . . .at least too much. Welcome to MojoTravels, and today we’re counting down our picks for the Top 10 Budget Destinations in 2020.

For this list, we’re looking at a variety of destinations from around the globe that are at least somewhat affordable and offer unique cultural experiences, natural wonders and plenty of opportunities to make memories that will last a lifetime.

#BudgetTravel #2020Tourism #AffordableTrips

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Top 10 Post-Pandemic Places to Travel in 2021 | MojoTravels

We’re obviously aware of and deeply concerned about the global pandemic, and are choosing carefully what to publish as forms of escapism and entertainment to help ease thoughts of anxiety, and provide an alternative from the news. We are obviously NOT encouraging anyone to travel now or discouraging social distancing.

Where should you travel next year?

#Travel #Top10 #Travel2021

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Top 10 Most Beautiful Places In The World

Top 10 Most Beautiful Places In The World. Subscribe http://goo.gl/Q2kKrD More incredible around-the-world content & awesome travel pics on Getty Images http://www.gettyimages.com/travel

The most beautiful travel destinations on planet earth, these are places from all around the globe that will take your breath away. WatchMojo presents the top 10 most beautiful places in the world. But what will make the top spot on our list? Iguazú Falls, Salar de Uyuni or Moraine Lake? Watch to find out!

00:25 #10. Palawan Island
01:02 #9. Seljalandsfoss
01:41 #8. Plitvice Lakes National Park
02:19 #7. Algar de Benagil
02:55 #6. Cliffs of Moher
03:33 #5. The Great Barrier Reef & Whitehaven Beach
05:13 #4. Antelope Canyon
04:46 #3, #2, #1 ???

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Tell us about a UK pick-your-own farm for the chance to win a holiday voucher | Travel


Few things scream summer more than strawberries and cream – and with DIY picking now in full swing (with social distancing measures in place), we want to hear about your favourite farms for filling your punnet.

Whether it’s strawberries, raspberries, cherries, rhubarb, blackberries – or anything else that’s in season, tell us where you love for a bit of pick-your-own and why. We promise not to tell if you follow the “one for the basket, two for me” technique!

If you have a relevant photo, do send it in – but it’s your words that will be judged for the competition.

Keep your tip to about 100 words

The best tip of the week, chosen by Tom Hall of Lonely Planet, will win a £200 voucher to stay at a Sawday’s property – the company has more than 3,000 in the UK and Europe. The best tips will appear on the Guardian Travel website, and maybe in the paper, too.

We’re sorry, but for legal reasons you must be a UK resident to enter this competition.

The competition closes on 22 June at 9am BST

Have a look at our past winners and other tips

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‘My favourite Christmas abroad’: readers’ travel tips | Christmas and New Year holidays


Winning tip: A zen Christmas with disco karaoke, Japan

One Christmas, I went to a zen meditation retreat in Oita, on the southernmost Kyushu island, because I was feeling very burned out. The meditation retreat, as you would imagine, was pretty relaxed and the resident monk and I got along very well. Oita is famous for its fugu – the poisonous puffer fish – and for Christmas dinner, I took the only other person at the retreat and the monk into the city for a fugu feast. After a visit to a karaoke bar where we sang I Will Survive, the three of us rounded our Christmas off at a whisky bar before riding the train back to the temple to meditate before bed. Best Christmas ever!
Sarah Martin

Festive fireworks on the beach, Bangkok

Beach at Ko Chang, Thailand
Beach at Ko Chang, Thailand

In Bangkok over Christmas, we decided to head to the island of Ko Chang. A five-hour drive was livened up by the karaoke machine in the back of the taxi. Our hotel’s attempt at roast turkey – served beachside – was not a great success. Fireworks and dancing at the Sabay Bar on White Sand beach that night were more like it. And splashing out on a speedboat back to the mainland on Boxing Day was a fun end to the trip.
David Hall

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Guardian Travel readers’ tips

Every week we ask our readers for recommendations from their travels. A selection of tips will be featured online and may appear in print. To enter the latest competition visit the readers’ tips homepage

The belénes of Granada, Spain

Alhambra, Granada.
Alhambra, Granada. Photograph: Alamy

Arriving late by bus, still wearing ski gear, we trundled our cabin bags over the cobbles in search of our rented apartment in the heart of medieval Granada. It was Christmas Eve. Everyone was out: drinking cava, sharing tapas or queuing to see the belénes, the nativity scenes set up in all the plazas. We went to midnight mass in the Cathedral, and on Christmas morning, climbed up to the viewpoint at the Albaicín, the old Moorish quarter. From there, the Alhambra looked sublime against its backdrop of snow-capped peaks, the same mountains we had skied down just the day before.
Helen Barnes

Romance on the 102nd floor, New York

Moonrise in New York City
Moonrise in New York City. Photograph: Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

New York, 2009. Baggage handlers kindly mislaid our luggage, making our engagement more problematic than I’d have liked, but the snow and the scenery and the gasp of “really?” when I popped the question atop the Empire State Building on Christmas morning, followed by a Christmas dinner of burgers in the Diamond District, more than made up for it. There really is no other place like it, certainly not at Christmas. Visiting the Plaza, Radio City Music Hall, taking a horse ride through Central Park – they all sound like cliches but were simply magical moments we’d recommend everyone experience. We spent a lot on phone calls to the airline, but who cares?
Jonathan Greenbank

A bushveld feast, South Africa

Olifants River seen from Olifants camp, Kruger national park, South Africa.
Olifants River seen from Olifants camp, Kruger national park. Photograph: Alamy

We had a family holiday at Shimuweni, a remote bushveld camp down a small dirt track in the Kruger national park, self-catering. After a day of drizzle we spent an hour trying to extract ourselves from the mud before sundown. No Christmas dinner has ever been quite such fun as a spatchcocked chicken masquerading as a turkey, green peppers (the only greens in the camp shop) as sprouts, baked potatoes cooked direct in the embers and some barbecued pineapple for pudding. Having hidden tinsel and a few tiny gifts in our hand luggage the whole trip, pulling them out to my parents’ utter surprise was entirely worth it.
Sophie

Retreading the missionary path, India

For Christmas in 2016, my family and I went on a trip to southern India to see where my mum spent six years of her childhood in the 60s when her dad was a missionary. It was a fascinating trip and surprisingly Christmassy in a weird and wonderful way – a whole cooked turkey with the head and neck still on, anyone? At the Christmas Day church service Mum bumped into a friend who she used to play with when she was a child, and we swam in the sea at Kovalam beach just as she did with her family all those years ago.
Alex Robinson

A wondrous walk, Jordan

Petra Bedouin
Photograph: Andre Pain/EPA

Our twist on Christmas was set in Jordan and began with a sleepless night on Christmas Eve in a wind-battered tent – although “tent” was a loose term for the patchy tarpaulins we used for shelter, and a structural collapse occurred at 3am. Despite the mishaps, Christmas morning began in style with a sip of prosecco and a bite of Mum’s homemade Christmas cake for all. Once clad in festive antlers, we set off on a walk through the mountains to the majestic monastery in Petra. Festive greetings from home and an unusual Christmas dinner, consisting of a cucumber, an orange and flatbread, rounded off a brilliant Christmas Day in one of the wonders of the world.
Rhian Thomas

An alternative white Christmas, Bolivia

Salar de Uyuni and cactus
Salar de Uyuni. Photograph: Aizar Raldes/Getty Images

My most unusual Christmas Day was on the Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia – white, but salt, not snow. We visited the Salt Hotel, then drove over packed salt to walk on a island with weird cactuses everywhere. Then it was on to a very basic hostel – no electricity (cold showers) and unisex dorms with cast-iron bunk beds – for a dinner of spag bol reheated over a gas cylinder burner and carols by candlelight. After a short night, Boxing Day saw us visiting the amazing Sol de Mañana geysers before heading to San Pedro de Atacama in Chile, which was like a wild west film set.
Micki Hobbs

Viennese whirlwind, Austria

Crowd of people skating in front of Rathausplatza
Photograph: Tolga Ildun/Alamy

With no plans on Christmas morning we searched for an impromptu mini-break and chose three nights in Vienna, departing Stansted at 8pm. No traffic, no queues, last train into the city, and a taxi around the Ringstrasse – illuminated golden bright on a silent night – for chocolate in bed as the clock struck midnight. Cafe Hawelka, Wiener wurst, Christmas markets, ice skating, Belvedere Museum Klimts, the ferris wheel at Prater, feeling giggly after gluhwein, looking for the Third Man aboard a clanking tram … Vienna simply dazzles at Christmas. Sometimes the unexpected presents are the best.
Sonia Marshall

Mastering the haka, New Zealand

Piha beach and Lion Rock at sunset, New Zealand
Piha beach and Lion Rock at sunset, New Zealand Photograph: Andrew Watson/Getty Images

Taking part in a local haka contest – and winning it – on Christmas Day on a New Zealand beach was the last thing I expected to do during my backpacking trip around the world. While sunbathing on Piha beach near Lion Rock, just outside Auckland, I was invited to learn the ceremonial dance so decided to go for it along with several other tourists. My terrific trainer, Ari (whose name apparently means Lion of God), should take all the credit for my prize – a large live sheep and a Māori tattoo on my shoulder. Strictly Come Dancing it certainly wasn’t, but a Christmas with a difference it sure was.
Greta Cooper



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Mum of three shares best travel tip for going overseas with children


Summer stories is 9Honey’s latest series where Nine reporters reflect on their favourite holiday memories over the years.

9News Brisbane Reporter Alison Ariotti’s advice for new parents travelling with children is simple: “You have to halve the expectations and double the amount of time it takes to do anything.”

The mum of three learnt the lesson the long way during her first overseas trip to Hawaii.

Summer Stories: ‘I went on the biggest nightmare road trip in the ’70s’

Alison Ariotti
“You have to halve the expectations and double the amount of time it takes to do anything.” (Supplied)

During a summer holiday in January last year, Ariotti gave her kids the dream holiday of their young lifetime — a stay at the Disney report, filled with entertainment activities, water slides and visits from their favourite cartoon characters.

“It was everything you needed for a family and they had the most beautiful time,” Ariotti tells 9Honey.

“But of course, it wasn’t without it’s disaster moments.”

Ariotti, husband Gerry, and their three children aged five, three and six months during the trip, decided to embark on a half-day long catamaran trip around the coast of Hawaii.

Summer Stories: ‘It’s an Australian summer in a nutshell’

“It was my husband and middle child’s birthday and it sounded so good in theory — turns out, it wasn’t the smartest of ideas.”

Within moments of setting foot onto the vessel, Arriotti discovered her eldest child suffers from severe seasickness, forcing her to remain stationary and curled up below deck during the entire ride.

Between managing one sick child, a baby in a carrier and another child, Ariotti and her husband were surrounded by a crowd that consisted of backpackers and people in bikinis knocking back champagne.

“It probably wasn’t the best moment or idea, but we got some hilarious photos of it.”

When the shores settled and the family were back on land, Ariotti was determined to make sure her husband’s birthday wish of surfing on Waikiki’s spectacular beaches came true.

Alison Ariotti
Within moments of setting foot onto the vessel, Arriotti discovered her eldest child suffers from severe seasickness. (Supplied)

“We had one night in Waikiki and after all the things we had to deal with, I wanted to make sure he got in at least one surf,” Ariotti explains.

“And right as he was about to head out, one of our kids was ready to vomit in the pool.”

The couple spent the rest of the afternoon on their final night on the tropical island looking after their daughtering and “attempting”, as Ariotti puts it, “to keep the kids entertained.”

“It was a mission to say the least,” she laughs.

Alison Ariotti
“We’re so glad we made those memories, and the kids have not stopped talking about it since.” (Supplied)

While the sun set and Ariotti’s husband wasn’t able to get his single surf in on the trip, the family look back on their first overseas summer together as the “memory of a lifetime.”

“Even though it was a challenge with three children under the age of five, stuck on a plane, sick, and whatever else we dealt with, you do get a sense of real achievement when you manage to have a fun time!” Ariotti shares.

“We’re so glad we made those memories, and the kids have not stopped talking about it since.”

Summer Stories: ‘The whole week was one bucket list tick after another’



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